Creative Enterprises: The Creative City (Writing 1)

Seeing Notting Hill as the creative area in London

Notting Hill used to be a residential area for the ‘cool kids’ but now, to just be able to afford a house or even a flat in central London, you will need a six figure salary (Proud, 2014). While wandering around Notting Hill, I have noticed quite a diversity within the area. The shops, restaurants, houses, the market and the people living there. Most of the residential buildings and houses have the look of newly renovated exteriors, suiting the area of Kensington and Chelsea, which in my opinion is the area that signifies wealthy living. However, It’s ridiculous to think that 50 years ago, this London’s hip and fashionable area was described as “a massive slum, crawling with rats and rubbish”. Even with the area being located within the most expensive area of the UK, the borough of Kensington and Chelsea, Notting Hill had been identified as the bad part (The Guide to Notting Hill, 2013).

In my point of view, development in real estates take a huge part in gentrifying the area. In the seminar on Creative City (2015) I’ve seen that working class people once lived in the Notting Hill before middle class people started to invest in the properties in order to renovate and sell them to the rich. Leading to the escalated cost of living, pushing away the previous working class people and in coming the wealth. Because of this, the surrounding area including local shops were re-opened as more expensive stores and cafes and would suit the new middle class residents and the rest follows from that.

Even so, In more recent history, the film Notting Hill has made an alternative history in a way, people want to visit the market because it was the location of a film they have seen (The History of Portobello Market, 2007). This went on to increase the popularity of the area, gaining more tourists and becoming one of the must-attended destinations in London.

Bibliography

Creative Enterprises: The Creative City (Writing 1)

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